Personal account, Arizona State prof. Now: postwar ed broadcasting history. He/him/his. Newsletter: eepurl.com/drxwvj

Tempe, AZ
Joined February 2008
Everyone deserves access to this joy.
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Someone's projecting "lazy and sloppy," maybe.
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Late in 1966, the NC VP for administration is apologizing to an Ashford legislator for not having a station up and running yet in western North Carolina. This network thing was harder to do than to imagine — coming a dozen years after the first statewide commission ETV report.
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* Asheville, not Ashford.
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Three stations in the western part of the state finally started operating in fall 1967. The next year, the five-state network broadcast a meeting in Asheville on the state’s Appalachian development plan. This was an immediate public benefit of a public broadcasting network.
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NC and WI in essence had a similar effective decision in 1954 — one station started by the flagship university — but one came through a referendum defeat (WI), and the other through a legislative commission that said, “let WUNC be a pilot.”
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By the early 1960s, the head of WUNC was receiving letters from around the state. “It’s unfair that we don’t get your programming.” That plus a federal law with a matching-basis facilities grant pushed the creation of a second commission, and state $$.
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In both places, educational broadcast advocates had utopian dreams — in NC, an eleven-station system. And they talked about the number of stations as if that was the key. Not “every town should have access to what Chapel Hill has.” That would’ve been better, I think.
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Oh, and some post-library foliage
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Today: more materials on building out the WUNC-TV network across the state, and connections WUNC's John Young made early in the Appalachian Regional Commission history.
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NAEB had an ad hoc committee that blessed a Kentucky Authority for Ed Television proposal to plan an Appalachian regional communications system. Nice early noises from HEW (it was an NDEA Title VII proposal) and ARC. Not sure anything came of it.
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In 1966, NC State had a proposal for a small planning grant ($37K), "Educational television: An ally in the war against poverty." Not sure who received it, or if anything happened. Interesting ideas in it, broadly public purpose.
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Interlude. Scholarship from the @WilsonLibUNC archives
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Today’s low was around freezing. Mid-50s now as I take a break outside. Archives are open 10-4. Do I work through without a break?
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History education telecourse flyer from 1959, through WUNC-TV. $18 for a 2-credit summer class. Exam on campus! For registration context the Department of Public Relations at Greensboro. Source: UNC television network records box 5, folder 126.
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Instead of a late pass.
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There's a pretty obvious political route for this that was unavailable with Medicaid: if a state declines to participate, offer something to municipalities.
NEW: The White House keeps saying Build Back Better would create "universal pre-k." But very unclear if that's true We talked to state GOP officials across the US - in MO, NH, NC, SC, MN & more - ready to reject the plan Prek goes through states. washingtonpost.com/business/…
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It’s a podcast wrapped up in a Substack inside an MLM
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